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By Southview Dermatology
June 08, 2021
Category: Skin Conditions
Tags: Alopecia  
AlopeciaIt can be incredibly distressing when you start to lose your hair unexpectedly. Alopecia is something that affects both men and women and this autoimmune disorder causes patches of hair to fall out. This condition is most often found in women under 30.
 
Alopecia Can Be Hereditary

If you develop alopecia you may want to point a finger at your genetics. In fact, both parents have the ability to pass down alopecia to their children. So, if you have a family member with alopecia areata then you may be more likely to develop this condition at some point during your lifetime. Of course, genetics isn’t the only factor that plays a role in whether or not you develop alopecia. There are other deciding factors, as well.
 
Alopecia Targets the Hair Follicles

As we mentioned above, alopecia areata is an autoimmune disorder, which means that the body attacks the hair follicles, causing them to slow or even halt hair growth. There are different kinds of alopecia and people experience different symptom severities. Some people may notice hair regrowth in a few months while others may not. Again, you must have a dermatologist that you can turn to for answers.
 
There are Solutions for Managing Alopecia

While there is no cure, there are treatment options out there that can help stimulate hair growth and reduce the immune system response. The type and severity of your alopecia, along with your age and the severity of your hair loss will play major roles in what types of treatment options are best for you. This is something that a skincare professional can discuss with you during your consultation.
 
For those with milder symptoms, there are injectable and topical medications that could help. Common treatments include,
  • Topical or injectable corticosteroids
  • Minoxidil solution (applied to the scalp to regrow hair)
  • Anthralin cream
Those with more severe symptoms may respond better to these treatment options,
  • Oral steroids
  • Immunomodulatory medications
  • Topical immunotherapy
If you are dealing with sudden hair loss, it’s important to talk with a dermatologist to find out what’s going on, so you know the best way to treat it. Alopecia can be distressing, but your dermatologist can provide you with options to improve hair regrowth and to once again boost your confidence in your appearance.
By Southview Dermatology
May 05, 2021
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Rash  
Skin RashFrom coming in contact with poison ivy to dealing with a high dose of stress, there are many reasons a rash might appear. Most of the time, a rash will go away on its own without treatment; however, it’s also important to recognize when a rash may warrant turning to a dermatologist for treatment.

What causes rashes?

There are so many reasons why a rash may surface. Rashes may be the result of a bacterial, fungal, or viral infection, or it could be caused by an allergy. Common causes of a rash include,
  • Atopic or contact dermatitis
  • Eczema
  • Pityriasis rosea
  • Hives
  • Insect bites and stings
  • Poison ivy, oak, or sumac
  • Rosacea
  • Measles
  • Ringworm
  • Impetigo
  • Psoriasis
  • Diaper rash
  • Shingles
  • Lichen planus
  • Chickenpox
  • Lupus
  • Scabies
  • Allergy to a drug/medication
How do I treat a rash?

Most rashes are mild, self-limiting, and can be treated on your own without having to turn to a doctor. Some ways to ease a rash and promote faster healing is by,
  • Using only gentle cleansers and soaps that do not contain harsh chemicals or fragrances
  • Avoiding hot water and only using lukewarm or cold water
  • Being gentle when cleansing, bathing, and handling the skin
  • Not covering the rash (let it breathe)
  • Using only unscented products
  • Applying calamine lotion to control itching
  • Using hydrocortisone cream to reduce itchiness, swelling, and redness
  • Not scratching the rash, as this can lead to an infection
When should I see a dermatologist about my rash?

It’s important to recognize when a rash probably requires medical attention. You should schedule an appointment with your dermatologist if,
  • The rash is widespread and takes over most of your body (this could be a sign of an allergic reaction, which requires immediate attention)
  • The rash is spreading quickly and suddenly
  • Your rash is accompanied by a fever (this is often a sign of serious infection)
  • The rash is painful or contains blisters
  • There are signs of infection such as oozing, crusting, or skin that’s warm to the touch
Dealing with a rash that is painful or causing your concern? If in doubt, don’t hesitate to call your dermatologist. We can discuss your symptoms over the phone and determine whether you should come in for a consultation.
By Southview Dermatology
April 05, 2021
Category: Skin Conditions
Atopic DermatitisWhen we think of skin disorders, we most often assume that these are problems that mostly adults deal with; however, children and teens can also deal with a wide range of skin problems. One of them is atopic dermatitis. Atopic dermatitis, also referred to as pediatric eczema, is a chronic skin problem that causes flare-ups of itchy, dry, red skin.

What causes atopic dermatitis in children?

Atopic dermatitis is surprisingly common among newborns and kids. Certain factors may play a role in whether your child develops atopic dermatitis. Some of these factors include genetics, weather, environment, temperature, and allergies. If dermatitis runs in your family then your child may be more at risk.

What are the signs of pediatric atopic dermatitis?

Not sure if your child is dealing with atopic dermatitis? Many of the symptoms are not unique to atopic dermatitis so it can be difficult to tell. This is why it’s important to turn to a qualified dermatologist if your child is dealing with any of these issues,
  • Dry skin
  • Intensely itchy skin
  • Thick, red, or swollen skin
  • Fluid-filled or crusty bumps on the skin
  • Rough bumps on the face or arms
  • Hives
How is atopic dermatitis treated?

There are several factors that a dermatologist will need to take into account to determine the best treatment plan for your child. Factors such as their overall health as well as the severity of their symptoms will play roles in the type of treatments we recommend. Your child’s treatment plan will include,
  • Avoiding known irritants and triggers such as certain soaps, detergents, and allergens (e.g., pet danger)
  • Keeping your child’s nails trim to prevent scratching and infection
  • Using gentle cleansers and products on your child’s skin
  • Corticosteroid creams
  • Antihistamines
  • Phototherapy (light therapy)
  • Biologics (strong medications used only in severe and unresponsive cases)
If your child is displaying signs of atopic dermatitis, you must schedule an appointment with your dermatologist to find out what’s going on. Any kind of persistent or recurring rash should be looked at by a skincare professional.
By Southview Dermatology
March 05, 2021
Category: Skin Treatments
Tags: Warts  

WartsWarts are the result of a virus known as the human papillomavirus (HPV), and they can easily be spread from one person to another through skin-to-skin contact or by sharing items such as towels or clothes with the infected individual. While warts of the hands may be unsightly or embarrassing, it’s important to note that these growths are benign and harmless. Here’s what you should know about treating warts, including how a dermatologist will treat this common skin problem.

How do I know that it’s a wart?

If you’ve never had a wart before then you may not know what this little growth is at first. Warts are raised, skin-colored bumps that may be rough to the touch and grainy in appearance. If you look closely at the bump you may notice little black dots. These are small blood vessels. Since warts can be confused for cysts and other lesions, it may be a good idea to see a dermatologist first before you begin treatment.

How are warts treated?

Some people simply wait until their body fights the infection and the wart eventually goes away, but this can take months or even years. People who are dealing with warts in more sensitive and visible places such as their hands are more likely to want to get rid of the wart a lot sooner. Many healthy individuals turn to over-the-counter remedies first. There are salicylic acid solutions that you can apply directly to the wart and will need to continue to reapply regularly. This solution will shed layers of the wart until gone.

While no study tests the effectiveness of duct tape for removing warts, it not an unsafe practice or option (and if it works for you, great!). If you’ve given it a valiant effort to treat the wart on your own but it just doesn’t seem to respond to over-the-counter treatment options, or it returns, then it’s time to see your dermatologist. A dermatologist offers a variety of ways to remove a wart, including,

  • Cryotherapy: Freezing the wart off is a common method for removing warts
  • Cantharidin: A chemical is applied to the wart, which causes it to blister and fall off
  • Surgical excision: If the bumps do not respond to other treatment options or are in hard-to-treat areas, this may be the ideal method for removal

We understand that warts can develop in rather awkward and sometimes uncomfortable places like the hands. If this happens to you and you don’t want to wait until your body clears the infection to get rid of your wart, then a dermatologist can provide you with the treatment you need to remove the wart more quickly.

By Southview Dermatology
February 09, 2021
Category: Skin Conditions
Tags: Lupus  
LupusLupus is an autoimmune disorder that leads to widespread inflammation and pain. Lupus can affect multiple systems and organs in the body, but the skin tends to be one of the most common organs affected by this chronic disease. According to the Lupus Foundation of America, around two-thirds of people with lupus will experience some kind of lupus-related skin issue. Some people are dealing with cutaneous lupus only, while others are dealing with cutaneous lupus along with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (the most common form of lupus).
 
Skin lupus can produce these skin problems,
 
A butterfly rash: This “malar” rash is a classic symptom of lupus. This purplish-red rash spreads over the bridge of the nose to the cheeks and looks similar in shape to a butterfly. A butterfly rash may look similar to a very bad flush or it may even be scaly, in more severe cases. Some people may mistake this for rosacea.
 
Rashes and sores: It’s also common for lesions and red, inflamed patches of scaly skin to develop with lupus. These rashes and sores are usually found on the face, scalp, ears, or other sun-exposed areas. While these sores typically aren’t painful, they can cause scarring (especially if they develop on the scalp). This is why it’s important to see a dermatologist if you are dealing with a recurring or persistent rash or sore.
 
Subacute cutaneous lesions: These small, scaly papules are caused by UV light. Unlike discoid lesions, which can cause scarring, subacute cutaneous lesions will not scar. These lesions are typically red and circular and develop on areas of the skin most often exposed to the sun.
 
Other symptoms associated with lupus include,
  • Sores in the mouth and nose (mucous membrane sores)
  • Hair loss, sometimes caused by discoid lesions
  • Purple spots (due to broken blood vessels) on the legs
Whether you’ve been diagnosed with cutaneous lupus or SLE, or you are experiencing a butterfly rash or other symptoms of lupus, you must visit your dermatologist as soon as possible for an evaluation. A dermatologist can easily identify lupus and provide you with solutions to help you get symptoms under control.




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